More from and about
C.S. Lewis
(biographical info at bottom of page)

  

No book is really worth reading at the age of ten which is not equally Ė 
and often far more Ė worth reading at the age of fifty and beyond.

   

It is a serious thing to live in a society of possible gods and goddesses, to remember that the dullest and most uninteresting person you can talk to may one day be a creature which, if you saw it now, you would be strongly tempted to worship, or else a horror and corruption such as you now meet, if at all, only in nightmare.  All day long we are, in some degree, helping each other to one or the other of these destinations.  It is in the light of these overwhelming possibilities, it is in the awe and circumspection proper to them that we should conduct all our dealings with one another, all friendships, all loves, all play, all politics.  There are no ordinary people.  You have never talked to a mere mortal.
  
  
I didnít go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of Port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly donít recommend Christianity.

      
It would seem that Our Lord finds our desires not too strong, but too weak. We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us, like an ignorant child who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the offer of a holiday at the sea. We are far too easily pleased.
  
If you look for truth, you may find comfort in the end; if you look for comfort you will not get either comfort or truth only soft soap and wishful thinking to begin, and in the end, despair.
   

You never know how much you really believe anything until its truth or falsehood becomes a matter of life and death to you.

     

What you see and what you hear depends a great deal on where you
are standing. It also depends on what sort of person you are.

   

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A proud person is always looking down on things and people;
and, of course, as long as you are looking down,
you cannot see something that is above you.

   

Don't use words too big for the subject. Don't say "infinitely"
when you mean "very"; otherwise you'll have no word left
when you want to talk about something really infinite.

   

When we lose one blessing, another is often most unexpectedly given in its place.

   
    
Clive Staples Lewis was born in Belfast, Ireland, as the son of A.J. Lewis, a solicitor, and Flora Augusta (Hamilton).  His mother, a promising mathematician, died when he was nine years old.  Lewis had been very close to his mother, who taught him to love books and encouraged him to study French and Latin.  Lewis and his brother were brought up by their father.  During his childhood, Lewis created the imaginary country of Bloxen. He started writing early - in the attic of their house he had a "study" where he composed his stories.  After attending schools in Hertfordshire, Northern Ireland and Malvern, he was educated at home from 1914-17.

"I am the product of long corridors, empty sunlit rooms, upstairs indoor silences, attics explored in solitude, distant noises of gurgling cisterns and pipes, and the noise of wind under the tiles.  Also of endless books," Lewis wrote in his autobiographical book Surprised by Joy (1955).  "There were books in the study, books in the drawing-room, books in the cloakroom, books (two deep) in the great bookcase on the landing, books in a bedroom, books piled as high as my shoulder in the cistern attic, books of all kinds reflecting every transient stage of my parents' interests, books readable and unreadable, books suitable for a child and books most empathically not.  Nothing was forbidden me.  In the seemingly endless rainy afternoons I took volume after volume from the shelves..."  Lewis's early favorites were Edith Nesbit's books, among them The Story of the Amulet (1906), which mixed fantasy with reality, and the uncut edition of Gulliver's Travels.  Later he read the Norse myths and sagas, and such historical books as Henryk Sienkiewicz's Quo Vadis and Lew Wallace's Ben Hur.  Later he also found The Odyssey, Voltaire, Milton and Spenser. Lewis's private tutor taught him to read Greek for pleasure.

  

  

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