More from and about
M. Scott Peck
(biographical info at bottom of page)

  

The difficulty we have in accepting responsibility for our behavior
lies in the desire to avoid the pain of the consequences of that behavior.

   

Life is difficult.  This is a great truth, one of the greatest truths.  It is a great truth because once we truly see this truth, we transcend it.  Once we truly know that life is difficult--once we truly understand and accept it-- then life is no longer difficult. Because once it is accepted, the fact that life is difficult no longer matters.
  
  
Whenever we seek to avoid the responsibility for our own behavior, we do so by attempting to give that responsibility to some other individual or organization or entity. But this means we then give away our power to that entity.

      
Love is the will to extend one's self for the purpose of nurturing one's own or another's spiritual growth... Love is as love does. Love is an act of will -- namely, both an intention and an action. Will also implies choice. We do not have to love. We choose to love.
  
  
It is in the whole process of meeting and solving problems that life has meaning. Problems are the cutting edge that distinguishes between success and failure. Problems call forth our courage and our wisdom; indeed, they create our courage and our wisdom. It is only because of problems that we grow mentally and spiritually. It is through the pain of confronting and resolving problems that we learn.
  
The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled. For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort, that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.
   

Life is complex.  Each one of us must make his own path through life.  There are no self-help manuals, no formulas, no easy answers.  The right road for one is the wrong road for another. . . The journey of life is not paved in blacktop; it is not brightly lit, and it has no road signs.  It is a rocky path through the wilderness.

     

If we know exactly where we're going, exactly how to get there,
and exactly what we'll see along the way, we won't learn anything.

   

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Love is the free exercise of choice. Two people love each other only when they
are quite capable of living without each other but choose to live with each other.

   

How strange that we should ordinarily feel compelled to hide our
wounds when we are all wounded! Community requires the ability
to expose our wounds and weaknesses to our fellow creatures.
It also requires the ability to be affected by the wounds of
others. . . But even more important is the love that arises among
us when we share, both ways, our woundedness.

   

All my life I used to wonder what I would become when I grew up.
Then, about seven years ago, I realized that I was never going to
grow up--that growing is an ever ongoing process.

   
   

I am dubious as to how far we can move toward global community--which
is the only way to achieve international peace--until we learn the basic
principles of community in our own individual lives and personal
spheres of influence.

The Different Drum

   
If you are determined not to risk pain, then you must do without many
things:  having children, getting married, the ecstasy of sex, the hope of
ambition, friendship--all that makes life alive, meaningful and significant.

The Road Less Traveled
  

The time and the quality of the time that their parents devote to them
indicate to children the degree to which they are valued by their
parents. . . . When children know that they are valued, when they
truly feel valued in the deepest parts of themselves, then they
feel valuable.  This knowledge is worth more than any gold.

The Road Less Traveled

    
M. Scott Peck was born on May 22, 1936 in New York City, the younger of two sons to David Warner Peck, a prominent lawyer and jurist, and his wife Elizabeth Saville.  He married Lily Ho in 1959, and they have three grown children.

Peck received his B.A. degree magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1958, and his M.D. degree from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in 1963.  From 1963 until 1972, he served in the United States Army, resigning from the position of Assistant Chief Psychiatry and Neurology Consultant to the Surgeon General of the Army with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and the Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster.  From 1972 to 1983, Peck was engaged in the private practice of psychiatry in Litchfield County, Connecticut.

On March 9, 1980 at the age of 43, Peck was nondenominationally baptized by a Methodist minister in an Episcopalian convent (where he has frequently gone on retreat).

Peck's first book, The Road Less Traveled, was published by Simon & Schuster in 1978. The book has sold over six million copies to date in North America alone, and has been translated into over 20 languages.

Peck is a nationally recognized authority on the relationship between religion and science, and the science of psychology in particular. In 1992 Dr. Peck was selected by the American Psychiatric Association as a distinguished psychiatrist lecturer "for his outstanding achievement in the field of psychiatry as an educator,
researcher and clinician."

Peck, although now "semi-retired," still does some management consulting to top management of organizations in the public, private, and non profit sectors, as well as occasional writing and editing.

In 1984, Peck and his wife met with nine others to establish The Foundation for Community Encouragement, a tax-exempt, nonprofit, public educational foundation, whose mission is to promote and teach the principles of Community. The Foundation (FCE) has seventy selected and trained leaders who conduct workshops for the general public and for organizations as diverse as churches, schools, government agencies, prisons, universities and businesses - throughout the world. Although now both retired from FCE's Board of Directors, the Pecks continue to serve FCE in an "elder" status which represents the rare privilege of
being able to give advice without having any responsibility.

As a result of his pioneering community building work, Dr. Peck is the recipient of the 1984 Kaleidoscope Award for Peacemaking and the 1994 Temple International Peace Prize. In 1996 he was also recipient of The Learning, Faith and Freedom Medal from Georgetown University.

  

  

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