More from and about
Kent Nerburn
(biographical info at bottom of page)

  

Love has its own time, its own season, and its own reasons
from coming and going. You cannot bribe it or coerce it or
reason it into staying. You can only embrace it when it arrives
and give it away when it comes to you.

   

Remember to be gentle with yourself and others. We are all children of chance, and none can say why some fields will blossom and others lay brown beneath the August sun. Care for those around you. Look past your differences. Their dreams are no less than yours, their choices in life no more easily made. And give. Give in any way you can, of whatever you possess. To give is to love. To withhold is to wither.  Care less for your harvest than how it is shared, and your life will have meaning and your heart will have peace.

      
When you give of yourself something new comes in to being... the world expands, a bit of goodness is brought forth and a small miracle occurs. You must never underestimate this miracle. Too many good people think they have to become Mother Teresa or Albert Schweitzer, or even Santa Claus, and perform great acts if they are to be givers. They don't see the simple openings of the heart that can be practiced anywhere with almost anyone.
  
We’re conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great moments. But great moments often catch us unaware – beautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one.
  
  
Loneliness is like sitting in an empty room and being aware of the space around you. It is a condition of separateness. Solitude is becoming one with the space around you. It is a condition of union. Loneliness is small, solitude is large. Loneliness closes in around you; solitude expands toward the infinite. Loneliness has its roots in words, in an internal conversation that nobody answers; solitude has its roots in the great silence of eternity.
   

In some corner of your life, you know more about something than anyone else on earth. The true measure of your education is not what you know, but how you share what you know with others.

     

Something precious is lost if we rush headlong into the details
of life without pausing for a moment to pay homage to
the mystery of life and the gift of another day.

   

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We humans are destined to live with our feet on the earth and our heads
in the heavens, and we can never be at peace because we are pulled both ways.

   

Love has its own time, its own season, and its own reasons
for coming and going. You cannot bribe it or coerce it or
reason it into staying. You can only embrace it when it
arrives and give it away when it comes to you.

   

Our actions in this world, and our ability to rise above the
limits of our own self-interest, live on far beyond us and play
their humble part in shaping a world of spirituality and peace.

   
    
Kent Nerburn is an author, sculptor, and educator who has been deeply involved in Native American issues and education.  He developed and directed an award-winning oral history project on the Red Lake Ojibwe reservation in Northern Minnesota.  In addition to being a program evaluator for the Minnesota Humanities Commission and serving on their selection board, he has served as a consultant in curriculum development for the American Indian Institute in Norman, Oklahoma, and has been a presenter before various groups, including the National Indian Education Association, and the President's blue ribbon panel on Indian Education.
 
Nerburn has served as project director for two books of oral history — To Walk the Red Road and We Choose to Remember. He has also edited three highly acclaimed books on Native American subjects:  Native American Wisdom, The Wisdom of the Great Chiefs, and The Soul of An Indian.  Nerburn is also the author of Letters To My Son, a book of essays written as a gift to his son; Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads won the Minnesota Book Award for 1995; Simple Truths: Clear and Gentle Guidance on the Big Issues of Life; A Haunting Reverence:  Meditations On a Northern Land; and Small Graces: The Quiet Gifts of Everyday Life.

Kent Nerburn holds a Ph.D. in both Theology and Art, and lives with his family in northern Minnesota.

Visit Kent's website at kentnerburn.com!

   
A few excerpts from Mr. Nerburn:

On Giving
Education
On Strength
  

  

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